• Global Literacy Talks

    Using modules from the Council on Foreign Relations’ World101 website and timely pieces from The New York Times, we invite you to join for a lively facilitated conversation filled with civil discourse and, most importantly, your voice. All AASCU-affiliated students, faculty, and staff welcome!


    Recordings of past talks:

    • Wednesday, October 20:
      Women, Education, and Afghanistan

      Our series kicked off this year with a conversation about the current situation for Afghan women seeking to gain an education. Joined by Nadia Hashimi, MD, of the Afghan-American Foundation and Haris Tarin, Senior Advisor of the Operation Allies Welcome (OAW), who shared background about the situation, we spent time in breakout rooms and had a lively and impactful discussion of avenues of advocacy with students, faculty, and staff from across the country. Explore the resources listed here to find how you can help.    

    • Wednesday, November 17: 
      Championing the Global Agenda: American Higher Ed's Role in Advancing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

      This session, which occurred during International Education Week, featured Ramu Damodaran, First Chief, United Nations Academic Impact. It focused on the role of American Higher Education institutions in advancing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to champion the global agenda. SDGs are an urgent call for action by all countries - developed and developing - in a global partnership to end poverty, improve health and education, reduce inequality, spur economic growth, tackle climate change and more. Explore the resources listed here for more information.

    • Wednesday, February 16:
      Migration, Displacement, and Immigration
      This GLT session highlighted the importance of “bringing the global to local,” especially as it relates to vulnerable populations within our campus communities. There are over one million international students enrolled in higher education institutions across the United States, many of whom continue to face uncertainty about their academic futures in the United States, based on ever-changing immigration policies, more recently compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic. Courtney Luque Jacobson, Director of International Student and Scholar Services at Northern Arizona University and Sohail Agboatwala, Senior Vice Chancellor for Student Services and Administration at Troy University, discussed the current realities of international students in the United States. As a group, we suggested ways students, faculty, and institutional leaders can work together to address the realities of the international student experience. Explore the resources listed here for more ways to explore this topic and the wider topic of migration, immigration, and displacement.

    • Wednesday, March 16:
      Unpacking World Problems

      Thank you to Charles Hopkins, Director of Teaching and Learning at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Don Betz, Executive Director of International Programs and Global Initiatives at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, who shared critical insights and information with us during this talk. We discussed the current Russian invasion of Ukraine, economic sanctions, and historical and geopolitical reasons for global conflicts. Although we left the session with more questions than answers, deep connections with our peers and colleagues were made and several thoughts were shared on how we can make a difference and support democracy.  Please explore the resources.  

    • Wednesday, April 20, 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET:
      A Conversation on Climate Change

      Thank you to Beth Chalecki, who shared a comprehensive and concise overview of the issue of climate change and included a rousing call to action for how we can make a difference. In this session, we discussed a number of strategies to combat climate change and wrestled with how to encourage individual and collective actions. Please explore the resources.

ACADEMIC INNOVATION AND TRANSFORMATION